A collection of stories celebrating our love of the theatre from fans - both onstage and offstage.



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From the makers of
Producing Juliet

Producing Juliet



The Stage
Fortune Theatre, London
My Stage Story
"I’ve always been a huge fan of anything remotely spooky; the scarier the better. About 12 years ago now, when I was 13 (that makes me feel ancient!), I went to the Fortune theatre to see The Woman in Black.
"I went as a school group with my drama class and we all sat in the stalls before the show started, giggling nervously about what was in store for us. We’d been told it was the most terrifying experience. It’s only acted out by 2 men who are telling the story of the ghostly woman in black.
"At one point in the show a ghostly figure of a woman in black glides down the central aisle and stands in the audience (I don’t feel too bad about revealing this as most people know about it!) She stood right next to my best friend Claire, and the whole row of us school kids jumped up and screamed.
"But Claire didn’t flinch at all, she looked at us as if we were all mad. I have no idea to this day how she did it but she managed to convince us that she hadn’t seen the ghostly woman and that we were all imagining things.
"She kept it up for years and years, always pretending not to know what we were talking about whenever any of us retold the story. We gradually believed that she was some kind of spook scarer who frightened ghosts away.
"A few years ago Claire sent me a photo of herself standing outside the Fortune theatre with someone in a black cloak, pretending to be the ghost. It reminded me what fun we had at the Fortune and how brilliant the show is, it’s stuck with me for years and gave me wonderful memories to share with my best friend."
Based in London, Emma Johnson is a fan of all things spooky.
Image source/credit: Covent Garden/Fortune Theatre, London
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

Fortune Theatre, London

My Stage Story

"I’ve always been a huge fan of anything remotely spooky; the scarier the better. About 12 years ago now, when I was 13 (that makes me feel ancient!), I went to the Fortune theatre to see The Woman in Black.

"I went as a school group with my drama class and we all sat in the stalls before the show started, giggling nervously about what was in store for us. We’d been told it was the most terrifying experience. It’s only acted out by 2 men who are telling the story of the ghostly woman in black.

"At one point in the show a ghostly figure of a woman in black glides down the central aisle and stands in the audience (I don’t feel too bad about revealing this as most people know about it!) She stood right next to my best friend Claire, and the whole row of us school kids jumped up and screamed.

"But Claire didn’t flinch at all, she looked at us as if we were all mad. I have no idea to this day how she did it but she managed to convince us that she hadn’t seen the ghostly woman and that we were all imagining things.

"She kept it up for years and years, always pretending not to know what we were talking about whenever any of us retold the story. We gradually believed that she was some kind of spook scarer who frightened ghosts away.

"A few years ago Claire sent me a photo of herself standing outside the Fortune theatre with someone in a black cloak, pretending to be the ghost. It reminded me what fun we had at the Fortune and how brilliant the show is, it’s stuck with me for years and gave me wonderful memories to share with my best friend."

Based in London, Emma Johnson is a fan of all things spooky.

Image source/credit: Covent Garden/Fortune Theatre, London

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Players’ Ring Theatre in Portsmouth, NH
My Stage Story
"The first play I did after moving from New York City to New Hampshire was a production of Romeo and Juliet at The Players’ Ring Theatre in Portsmouth. I was cast as Lady Capulet. I remember my father was shocked when I told him. “Lady Capulet? Why not Juliet?!” I had played Juliet ten years earlier. It seems my dad had a hard time fathoming that I was now old enough to be a teenager’s mom. At the time, I was pregnant with my own daughter.
"I wasn’t showing yet. After I was offered the role, I disclosed my pregnancy to the director, not sure if it might be a deal-breaker. I left it up to her as to whether or not it would work within the show. It was the beginning of my second trimester, so I was feeling well and gaining energy back. My belly was just starting to swell. By the end of the run, it would be completely colossal and obvious. Nothing an Elizabethan costume couldn’t conceal, right? When I revealed that I was pregnant, the director, Kristan Curtis, said she did not have any problem with it if I didn’t. I decided to go ahead with the part, intrigued and fascinated about performing a Shakespeare play whilst a baby grew inside of me.
"I wondered if my prego belly would be a distraction. I did not want to take audience members out of the moment by thinking, “Oh, look, Lady Capulet is having another baby.” That would not work with the dramatic lines after Juliet’s death: “O me! O me! My child, my only life.” And: “But one, poor one, one poor and loving child, But one thing to rejoice and solace in…” I didn’t want people thinking, “Well, there’s another one on the way!” Theater is a suspension of disbelief anyway, so I just hoped people would tune out the reality of me as an actress being pregnant. With my high-waisted costume, perhaps they would just think Lady C was rotund, hitting the mead too hard.
"As weeks passed, I was in the habit of touching my belly quite a bit – rubbing it, resting my hand on it. All of these mannerisms could not be used in the play. I had to thwart any impulse to stand with my hand caressing my abdomen, as I was doing daily in real life. Two years before, I had played Stella in a New York production of A Streetcar Named Desire. Since Stella is pregnant, for that role I worked on all of the pregnancy mannerisms and movements I was now trying to restrain. During the second half of Streetcar, I wore a maternity pillow under my costume. Once it was strapped on, I instinctively waddled around rubbing my lower back and resting my hand atop it. I felt pretty legit. But now, for Lady C, it was the opposite: I was pregnant but could not act that way.
"At this time, my baby was really moving around. I clearly remember one day when we were rehearsing Act III, Scene 5, during which there is a lot of yelling. Lord and Lady Capulet are furious with Juliet and insist that she marry Paris. Lord Capulet, played by Tim Robinson, roared:
“My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blessed
That God had lent us but this only child,
But now I see this one is one too much,
And that we have a curse in having her.”
"At certain points in his speech, my daughter actually jumped due to the startling volume of his vehement voice. When we were running the show, this also happened during the loud clinks of metal throughout the combat scenes of Act V. The swordfights at the tomb caused jumps and kicks in the womb. As soon as I walked off stage, I would rub my belly in a comforting/soothing way as if to say, “It’s all right. Everything is okay.” In fact, there was a door that exited outside behind the theater. Sometimes I would walk offstage and continue all the way out there under the stars, to have a private, calming moment with my baby in belly. My impulse was to whisper, “It’s okay. It’s not real. We’re just acting!” (I actually did do that and say that, and I’ve never told anyone!)
"The back door of The Players’ Ring Theatre opens up onto beautiful Prescott Park in Portsmouth. It was June – there were boats in the distance, stars blazing above – and as I walked out, I felt a deep, jubilant connection to my new home, New Hampshire, my favorite writer, William Shakespeare, and the life growing inside of me, Vivian Madden. I will never forget those moments; they are attached to the play now.
"Epilogue: Interestingly, Vivian was very verbal early on, and has a voluminous vocabulary. I like to think it is because of all the Shakespeare she absorbed in the womb!"
Colleen A. Madden is an actress, writer, and graduate of NYU Tisch School of the Arts, who lives in New Hampshire with her husband and three young children.
Image source/credit: The Players’ Ring Facebook Page
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

The Players’ Ring Theatre in Portsmouth, NH

My Stage Story

"The first play I did after moving from New York City to New Hampshire was a production of Romeo and Juliet at The Players’ Ring Theatre in Portsmouth. I was cast as Lady Capulet. I remember my father was shocked when I told him. “Lady Capulet? Why not Juliet?!” I had played Juliet ten years earlier. It seems my dad had a hard time fathoming that I was now old enough to be a teenager’s mom. At the time, I was pregnant with my own daughter.

"I wasn’t showing yet. After I was offered the role, I disclosed my pregnancy to the director, not sure if it might be a deal-breaker. I left it up to her as to whether or not it would work within the show. It was the beginning of my second trimester, so I was feeling well and gaining energy back. My belly was just starting to swell. By the end of the run, it would be completely colossal and obvious. Nothing an Elizabethan costume couldn’t conceal, right? When I revealed that I was pregnant, the director, Kristan Curtis, said she did not have any problem with it if I didn’t. I decided to go ahead with the part, intrigued and fascinated about performing a Shakespeare play whilst a baby grew inside of me.

"I wondered if my prego belly would be a distraction. I did not want to take audience members out of the moment by thinking, “Oh, look, Lady Capulet is having another baby.” That would not work with the dramatic lines after Juliet’s death: “O me! O me! My child, my only life.” And: “But one, poor one, one poor and loving child, But one thing to rejoice and solace in…” I didn’t want people thinking, “Well, there’s another one on the way!” Theater is a suspension of disbelief anyway, so I just hoped people would tune out the reality of me as an actress being pregnant. With my high-waisted costume, perhaps they would just think Lady C was rotund, hitting the mead too hard.

"As weeks passed, I was in the habit of touching my belly quite a bit – rubbing it, resting my hand on it. All of these mannerisms could not be used in the play. I had to thwart any impulse to stand with my hand caressing my abdomen, as I was doing daily in real life. Two years before, I had played Stella in a New York production of A Streetcar Named Desire. Since Stella is pregnant, for that role I worked on all of the pregnancy mannerisms and movements I was now trying to restrain. During the second half of Streetcar, I wore a maternity pillow under my costume. Once it was strapped on, I instinctively waddled around rubbing my lower back and resting my hand atop it. I felt pretty legit. But now, for Lady C, it was the opposite: I was pregnant but could not act that way.

"At this time, my baby was really moving around. I clearly remember one day when we were rehearsing Act III, Scene 5, during which there is a lot of yelling. Lord and Lady Capulet are furious with Juliet and insist that she marry Paris. Lord Capulet, played by Tim Robinson, roared:

“My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blessed

That God had lent us but this only child,

But now I see this one is one too much,

And that we have a curse in having her.”

"At certain points in his speech, my daughter actually jumped due to the startling volume of his vehement voice. When we were running the show, this also happened during the loud clinks of metal throughout the combat scenes of Act V. The swordfights at the tomb caused jumps and kicks in the womb. As soon as I walked off stage, I would rub my belly in a comforting/soothing way as if to say, “It’s all right. Everything is okay.” In fact, there was a door that exited outside behind the theater. Sometimes I would walk offstage and continue all the way out there under the stars, to have a private, calming moment with my baby in belly. My impulse was to whisper, “It’s okay. It’s not real. We’re just acting!” (I actually did do that and say that, and I’ve never told anyone!)

"The back door of The Players’ Ring Theatre opens up onto beautiful Prescott Park in Portsmouth. It was June – there were boats in the distance, stars blazing above – and as I walked out, I felt a deep, jubilant connection to my new home, New Hampshire, my favorite writer, William Shakespeare, and the life growing inside of me, Vivian Madden. I will never forget those moments; they are attached to the play now.

"Epilogue: Interestingly, Vivian was very verbal early on, and has a voluminous vocabulary. I like to think it is because of all the Shakespeare she absorbed in the womb!"

Colleen A. Madden is an actress, writer, and graduate of NYU Tisch School of the Arts, who lives in New Hampshire with her husband and three young children.

Image source/credit: The Players’ Ring Facebook Page

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
My elementary school
My Stage Story
"The first time I got a direct offer - being offered a role without having to audition, an actor’s dream! - I was five years old.
"In the story of my life, many chapters are filled with theatre tales. The first time I appeared in a full play was in first grade. One day, an administrator walked into our classroom and announced the names of three students she needed to see. Once gathered, she informed us that they wanted us to act in the school play. When she offered me the role of the narrator, I said yes immediately. I was the smallest, loudest (*ahem* best projection!), and happiest kid on stage.
"I still am."
Based in LA, Allie Costa is an actress, writer, singer, and director.
Image source/credit: Chicago Sun-Times
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

My elementary school

My Stage Story

"The first time I got a direct offer - being offered a role without having to audition, an actor’s dream! - I was five years old.

"In the story of my life, many chapters are filled with theatre tales. The first time I appeared in a full play was in first grade. One day, an administrator walked into our classroom and announced the names of three students she needed to see. Once gathered, she informed us that they wanted us to act in the school play. When she offered me the role of the narrator, I said yes immediately. I was the smallest, loudest (*ahem* best projection!), and happiest kid on stage.

"I still am."

Based in LA, Allie Costa is an actress, writer, singer, and director.

Image source/credit: Chicago Sun-Times

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Globe, London
My Stage Story
"I’m not usually one for the theatre, but I was very curious about the (then relatively) new Globe. We had been drinking on the South Bank and were sauntering up the river when we ended up outside the theatre while the ‘ushers’ on the gate were calling the audience in. The box office only had groundling tickets left - the standing tickets - and at only £5 and the only unrestricted view in front of the stage, we bought a couple and went in to a production of The Tempest, where Prospero was being played by the immutable Vanessa Redgrave.
"Despite being the middle of summer, the sky above us opened and a flash storm started raining down on us, right in the middle of Prospero’s big speech on the island. We were standing there, shivering as much from our drenched shorts and tank tops as from being enthralled by nature’s contribution to this fantastic performance unfolding in front of us.
"The storm ended almost after the speech and for the remainder of the show we stood huddled in quiet awe."
Based between LA and Berlin, Suzannah Brooke works in A&R for Sony.
Image source/credit: Shakespeare’s Globe
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

The Globe, London

My Stage Story

"I’m not usually one for the theatre, but I was very curious about the (then relatively) new Globe. We had been drinking on the South Bank and were sauntering up the river when we ended up outside the theatre while the ‘ushers’ on the gate were calling the audience in. The box office only had groundling tickets left - the standing tickets - and at only £5 and the only unrestricted view in front of the stage, we bought a couple and went in to a production of The Tempest, where Prospero was being played by the immutable Vanessa Redgrave.

"Despite being the middle of summer, the sky above us opened and a flash storm started raining down on us, right in the middle of Prospero’s big speech on the island. We were standing there, shivering as much from our drenched shorts and tank tops as from being enthralled by nature’s contribution to this fantastic performance unfolding in front of us.

"The storm ended almost after the speech and for the remainder of the show we stood huddled in quiet awe."

Based between LA and Berlin, Suzannah Brooke works in A&R for Sony.

Image source/credit: Shakespeare’s Globe

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
Grand Theatre, Lodz, Poland
My Stage Story
"I will never forget my first visit to theatre. It was a school trip. Sure, I’d seen small plays before then, but this was real theatre, with huge wooden staircases, a massive stage and hundreds of people watching. I must have been about 12 and it felt like a different world to me.
"We watched a ballet and I remember being absolutely mesmerised by the dancers on stage. It was a modern production with fantastic music and a great story.
"In fact I liked it so much, that when my school organised for another group to go and see it, I asked my mum to buy me a ticket so I could go again. Think I ended up seeing that ballet three times in the space of a few weeks and felt the same excitement each time.
"That was when I realised how amazing theatre can be. Whether it’s a play, a ballet or a musical - watching artists perform on stage is an absolute dream for me. I simply can’t imagine a life without it."
Eva Grzybek works behind the scenes at AOL & Huffington Post in London.
Image source: Grand Theatre
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

Grand Theatre, Lodz, Poland

My Stage Story

"I will never forget my first visit to theatre. It was a school trip. Sure, I’d seen small plays before then, but this was real theatre, with huge wooden staircases, a massive stage and hundreds of people watching. I must have been about 12 and it felt like a different world to me.

"We watched a ballet and I remember being absolutely mesmerised by the dancers on stage. It was a modern production with fantastic music and a great story.

"In fact I liked it so much, that when my school organised for another group to go and see it, I asked my mum to buy me a ticket so I could go again. Think I ended up seeing that ballet three times in the space of a few weeks and felt the same excitement each time.

"That was when I realised how amazing theatre can be. Whether it’s a play, a ballet or a musical - watching artists perform on stage is an absolute dream for me. I simply can’t imagine a life without it."

Eva Grzybek works behind the scenes at AOL & Huffington Post in London.

Image source: Grand Theatre

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar, London
My Stage Story
"I was offered a spontaneous night of theatre by a fellow actor and I was surprised when he told me the venue was a pub in Highbury and Islington? The Hen and Chickens Theatre Pub. I had never seen a play or performance in a pub and I did not know what to expect. 
"I entered the pub and had the regular punters staring at me once I asked the pub Landlord where the theatre was. He directed me upstairs. There was a small area designated for the performance and a few random seats set in a row for seating. 
"As I sat sceptically with my pint, my naïve arrogant actor mind who thought that a theatre performance only existed in a theatre, not a pub was about to be blown away! As soon as they stepped onto the performance area, I was captivated by the actors. They brought so much energy and fun that they had me like a child at the edge of my seat laughing and howling and all achieved in a tiny corner of the pub. The intimate setting meant the scenes with more than one actor were all the more touching and heightened my experience more. 
"So this is my most memorable story as it obviously taught me that no matter where you want to tell a story and entertain an audience, as long as you are prepared to give it all and you enjoy doing what you do up there then the audience get more than what they paid for."
Nelsy Casallas is a London based actor.
Image source: The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar, London

My Stage Story

"I was offered a spontaneous night of theatre by a fellow actor and I was surprised when he told me the venue was a pub in Highbury and Islington? The Hen and Chickens Theatre Pub. I had never seen a play or performance in a pub and I did not know what to expect.

"I entered the pub and had the regular punters staring at me once I asked the pub Landlord where the theatre was. He directed me upstairs. There was a small area designated for the performance and a few random seats set in a row for seating.

"As I sat sceptically with my pint, my naïve arrogant actor mind who thought that a theatre performance only existed in a theatre, not a pub was about to be blown away! As soon as they stepped onto the performance area, I was captivated by the actors. They brought so much energy and fun that they had me like a child at the edge of my seat laughing and howling and all achieved in a tiny corner of the pub. The intimate setting meant the scenes with more than one actor were all the more touching and heightened my experience more.

"So this is my most memorable story as it obviously taught me that no matter where you want to tell a story and entertain an audience, as long as you are prepared to give it all and you enjoy doing what you do up there then the audience get more than what they paid for."

Nelsy Casallas is a London based actor.

Image source: The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
Edinburgh Festival Fringe - Edinburgh, Scotland
My Stage Story
"When I was 21 I was lucky enough to travel to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in Scotland. It was my first look at professional, artist-driven theater - everything else I had experienced up until that point was community theater, major regional theater, and Broadway tours (none of which seemed to have a palpable voice of the actor.) 
"In Edinburgh I was blown away by a) the amount of theater that was being put up in every nook and cranny in the city, and b) how compelling the art was when being produced and promoted by the very artists on that stage. I was inspired by the structure - actors promoted their shows in the daytime by passing out postcards on the street and supporting other people’s work, and then they performed for that cultivated audience at night. It was a community driven, artistically compelling process that has stuck with me. "Through writing this story, I’ve just now realized that this time in Edinburgh is, in part, what has inspired me to produce actor-driven work through The Seeing Place Theater. I’m trying to recreate the experience I had that one enchanting summer when the world was opening up to me for the first time. That’s the magic of live theatre."
Based in New York City, Erin Cronican is an actor and founding member of The Seeing Place Theater
Image source: The News Daily
Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

Edinburgh Festival Fringe - Edinburgh, Scotland

My Stage Story

"When I was 21 I was lucky enough to travel to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in Scotland. It was my first look at professional, artist-driven theater - everything else I had experienced up until that point was community theater, major regional theater, and Broadway tours (none of which seemed to have a palpable voice of the actor.)

"In Edinburgh I was blown away by a) the amount of theater that was being put up in every nook and cranny in the city, and b) how compelling the art was when being produced and promoted by the very artists on that stage. I was inspired by the structure - actors promoted their shows in the daytime by passing out postcards on the street and supporting other people’s work, and then they performed for that cultivated audience at night. It was a community driven, artistically compelling process that has stuck with me.

"Through writing this story, I’ve just now realized that this time in Edinburgh is, in part, what has inspired me to produce actor-driven work through The Seeing Place Theater. I’m trying to recreate the experience I had that one enchanting summer when the world was opening up to me for the first time. That’s the magic of live theatre."

Based in New York City, Erin Cronican is an actor and founding member of The Seeing Place Theater

Image source: The News Daily

Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
Cambridge Theatre, London
My Stage Story
"I recently took my ten year old daughter, Abi, to a matinee of Matilda. We read the book together when she was younger, and the film has always been one of our favourites.
"I’m not usually one for musicals but we thoroughly enjoyed this one. All the kids in it were fantastically energetic and Alex Gaumond was brilliant as Miss Trunchbull. The stage set is evocative of the children’s theatre we used to see on school trips in the 80s.
"I don’t get to see my daughter a lot (I’m a weekend Dad) so there’s a bit of pressure to find things to do that create meaningful memories. Going to the theatre never fails - there’s a sense of occasion and magic built into the experience. Plus, with the internet touching everything, it still remains a relatively ‘pure’ place to be."
Based between London and Hong Kong, Richard Norris is an analyst for one of the world’s largest management consultancies.
Image credit: Matilda The Musical UK
Have you seen a show that’s moved you? Share it - submit your Stage Story!

The Stage

Cambridge Theatre, London

My Stage Story

"I recently took my ten year old daughter, Abi, to a matinee of Matilda. We read the book together when she was younger, and the film has always been one of our favourites.

"I’m not usually one for musicals but we thoroughly enjoyed this one. All the kids in it were fantastically energetic and Alex Gaumond was brilliant as Miss Trunchbull. The stage set is evocative of the children’s theatre we used to see on school trips in the 80s.

"I don’t get to see my daughter a lot (I’m a weekend Dad) so there’s a bit of pressure to find things to do that create meaningful memories. Going to the theatre never fails - there’s a sense of occasion and magic built into the experience. Plus, with the internet touching everything, it still remains a relatively ‘pure’ place to be."

Based between London and Hong Kong, Richard Norris is an analyst for one of the world’s largest management consultancies.

Image credit: Matilda The Musical UK

Have you seen a show that’s moved you? Share it - submit your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Soho Theatre, London
My Stage Story
My favourite recent experience happened while I was performing at The Soho Theatre in London, UK: Return of the Vanishing Peasant - a one-man show written by Ros Martin and directed by Caroline Rippin for the Menagerie Theatre Company and its annual HOTBED Festival.
Thanks to the Soho Theatre’s continuous support of new writing, this story, about young Brazilian peasant Carlos fighting for his people’s rights, was able to reach London audiences. And it did so at a crucial moment: the protests in Brazil had started once again.
Caroline (my director) and I would read the newspaper on the train while on our way to rehearsals or touring through different cities in the UK and we would find out what the current status of the riots was.
It was a powerful and important experience for us. We felt like we were echoing their fight in a different part of the world, we were listening and being part of something very current. Audience members would approach us after the shows and express the deep impact the piece had had on them. They wanted to know more. They would go home and research, some said.
And I thought, “People don’t seem to listen to each other out there in the world,.. but maybe we can still do it inside a Theatre.” And that still gives me hope.
Originally from Vienna, Vincent Kerschbaum is a London based actor.
Image credit: Andrew Wilkinson (photographer) for Menagerie Theatre Company
Submit your Stage Story

The Stage

The Soho Theatre, London

My Stage Story

My favourite recent experience happened while I was performing at The Soho Theatre in London, UK: Return of the Vanishing Peasant - a one-man show written by Ros Martin and directed by Caroline Rippin for the Menagerie Theatre Company and its annual HOTBED Festival.

Thanks to the Soho Theatre’s continuous support of new writing, this story, about young Brazilian peasant Carlos fighting for his people’s rights, was able to reach London audiences. And it did so at a crucial moment: the protests in Brazil had started once again.

Caroline (my director) and I would read the newspaper on the train while on our way to rehearsals or touring through different cities in the UK and we would find out what the current status of the riots was.

It was a powerful and important experience for us. We felt like we were echoing their fight in a different part of the world, we were listening and being part of something very current. Audience members would approach us after the shows and express the deep impact the piece had had on them. They wanted to know more. They would go home and research, some said.

And I thought, “People don’t seem to listen to each other out there in the world,.. but maybe we can still do it inside a Theatre.” And that still gives me hope.

Originally from Vienna, Vincent Kerschbaum is a London based actor.

Image credit: Andrew Wilkinson (photographer) for Menagerie Theatre Company

Submit your Stage Story