A collection of stories celebrating our love of the theatre from fans - both onstage and offstage.



Submit your stage story



From the makers of
Producing Juliet

Producing Juliet



The Stage
My elementary school
My Stage Story
"The first time I got a direct offer - being offered a role without having to audition, an actor’s dream! - I was five years old.
"In the story of my life, many chapters are filled with theatre tales. The first time I appeared in a full play was in first grade. One day, an administrator walked into our classroom and announced the names of three students she needed to see. Once gathered, she informed us that they wanted us to act in the school play. When she offered me the role of the narrator, I said yes immediately. I was the smallest, loudest (*ahem* best projection!), and happiest kid on stage.
"I still am."
Based in LA, Allie Costa is an actress, writer, singer, and director.
Image source/credit: Chicago Sun-Times
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

My elementary school

My Stage Story

"The first time I got a direct offer - being offered a role without having to audition, an actor’s dream! - I was five years old.

"In the story of my life, many chapters are filled with theatre tales. The first time I appeared in a full play was in first grade. One day, an administrator walked into our classroom and announced the names of three students she needed to see. Once gathered, she informed us that they wanted us to act in the school play. When she offered me the role of the narrator, I said yes immediately. I was the smallest, loudest (*ahem* best projection!), and happiest kid on stage.

"I still am."

Based in LA, Allie Costa is an actress, writer, singer, and director.

Image source/credit: Chicago Sun-Times

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Globe, London
My Stage Story
"I’m not usually one for the theatre, but I was very curious about the (then relatively) new Globe. We had been drinking on the South Bank and were sauntering up the river when we ended up outside the theatre while the ‘ushers’ on the gate were calling the audience in. The box office only had groundling tickets left - the standing tickets - and at only £5 and the only unrestricted view in front of the stage, we bought a couple and went in to a production of The Tempest, where Prospero was being played by the immutable Vanessa Redgrave.
"Despite being the middle of summer, the sky above us opened and a flash storm started raining down on us, right in the middle of Prospero’s big speech on the island. We were standing there, shivering as much from our drenched shorts and tank tops as from being enthralled by nature’s contribution to this fantastic performance unfolding in front of us.
"The storm ended almost after the speech and for the remainder of the show we stood huddled in quiet awe."
Based between LA and Berlin, Suzannah Brooke works in A&R for Sony.
Image source/credit: Shakespeare’s Globe
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

The Globe, London

My Stage Story

"I’m not usually one for the theatre, but I was very curious about the (then relatively) new Globe. We had been drinking on the South Bank and were sauntering up the river when we ended up outside the theatre while the ‘ushers’ on the gate were calling the audience in. The box office only had groundling tickets left - the standing tickets - and at only £5 and the only unrestricted view in front of the stage, we bought a couple and went in to a production of The Tempest, where Prospero was being played by the immutable Vanessa Redgrave.

"Despite being the middle of summer, the sky above us opened and a flash storm started raining down on us, right in the middle of Prospero’s big speech on the island. We were standing there, shivering as much from our drenched shorts and tank tops as from being enthralled by nature’s contribution to this fantastic performance unfolding in front of us.

"The storm ended almost after the speech and for the remainder of the show we stood huddled in quiet awe."

Based between LA and Berlin, Suzannah Brooke works in A&R for Sony.

Image source/credit: Shakespeare’s Globe

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
Grand Theatre, Lodz, Poland
My Stage Story
"I will never forget my first visit to theatre. It was a school trip. Sure, I’d seen small plays before then, but this was real theatre, with huge wooden staircases, a massive stage and hundreds of people watching. I must have been about 12 and it felt like a different world to me.
"We watched a ballet and I remember being absolutely mesmerised by the dancers on stage. It was a modern production with fantastic music and a great story.
"In fact I liked it so much, that when my school organised for another group to go and see it, I asked my mum to buy me a ticket so I could go again. Think I ended up seeing that ballet three times in the space of a few weeks and felt the same excitement each time.
"That was when I realised how amazing theatre can be. Whether it’s a play, a ballet or a musical - watching artists perform on stage is an absolute dream for me. I simply can’t imagine a life without it."
Eva Grzybek works behind the scenes at AOL & Huffington Post in London.
Image source: Grand Theatre
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

Grand Theatre, Lodz, Poland

My Stage Story

"I will never forget my first visit to theatre. It was a school trip. Sure, I’d seen small plays before then, but this was real theatre, with huge wooden staircases, a massive stage and hundreds of people watching. I must have been about 12 and it felt like a different world to me.

"We watched a ballet and I remember being absolutely mesmerised by the dancers on stage. It was a modern production with fantastic music and a great story.

"In fact I liked it so much, that when my school organised for another group to go and see it, I asked my mum to buy me a ticket so I could go again. Think I ended up seeing that ballet three times in the space of a few weeks and felt the same excitement each time.

"That was when I realised how amazing theatre can be. Whether it’s a play, a ballet or a musical - watching artists perform on stage is an absolute dream for me. I simply can’t imagine a life without it."

Eva Grzybek works behind the scenes at AOL & Huffington Post in London.

Image source: Grand Theatre

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar, London
My Stage Story
"I was offered a spontaneous night of theatre by a fellow actor and I was surprised when he told me the venue was a pub in Highbury and Islington? The Hen and Chickens Theatre Pub. I had never seen a play or performance in a pub and I did not know what to expect. 
"I entered the pub and had the regular punters staring at me once I asked the pub Landlord where the theatre was. He directed me upstairs. There was a small area designated for the performance and a few random seats set in a row for seating. 
"As I sat sceptically with my pint, my naïve arrogant actor mind who thought that a theatre performance only existed in a theatre, not a pub was about to be blown away! As soon as they stepped onto the performance area, I was captivated by the actors. They brought so much energy and fun that they had me like a child at the edge of my seat laughing and howling and all achieved in a tiny corner of the pub. The intimate setting meant the scenes with more than one actor were all the more touching and heightened my experience more. 
"So this is my most memorable story as it obviously taught me that no matter where you want to tell a story and entertain an audience, as long as you are prepared to give it all and you enjoy doing what you do up there then the audience get more than what they paid for."
Nelsy Casallas is a London based actor.
Image source: The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar
Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar, London

My Stage Story

"I was offered a spontaneous night of theatre by a fellow actor and I was surprised when he told me the venue was a pub in Highbury and Islington? The Hen and Chickens Theatre Pub. I had never seen a play or performance in a pub and I did not know what to expect.

"I entered the pub and had the regular punters staring at me once I asked the pub Landlord where the theatre was. He directed me upstairs. There was a small area designated for the performance and a few random seats set in a row for seating.

"As I sat sceptically with my pint, my naïve arrogant actor mind who thought that a theatre performance only existed in a theatre, not a pub was about to be blown away! As soon as they stepped onto the performance area, I was captivated by the actors. They brought so much energy and fun that they had me like a child at the edge of my seat laughing and howling and all achieved in a tiny corner of the pub. The intimate setting meant the scenes with more than one actor were all the more touching and heightened my experience more.

"So this is my most memorable story as it obviously taught me that no matter where you want to tell a story and entertain an audience, as long as you are prepared to give it all and you enjoy doing what you do up there then the audience get more than what they paid for."

Nelsy Casallas is a London based actor.

Image source: The Hen & Chickens Theatre Bar

Seen a show or been in one that’s inspired you? Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
Edinburgh Festival Fringe - Edinburgh, Scotland
My Stage Story
"When I was 21 I was lucky enough to travel to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in Scotland. It was my first look at professional, artist-driven theater - everything else I had experienced up until that point was community theater, major regional theater, and Broadway tours (none of which seemed to have a palpable voice of the actor.) 
"In Edinburgh I was blown away by a) the amount of theater that was being put up in every nook and cranny in the city, and b) how compelling the art was when being produced and promoted by the very artists on that stage. I was inspired by the structure - actors promoted their shows in the daytime by passing out postcards on the street and supporting other people’s work, and then they performed for that cultivated audience at night. It was a community driven, artistically compelling process that has stuck with me. "Through writing this story, I’ve just now realized that this time in Edinburgh is, in part, what has inspired me to produce actor-driven work through The Seeing Place Theater. I’m trying to recreate the experience I had that one enchanting summer when the world was opening up to me for the first time. That’s the magic of live theatre."
Based in New York City, Erin Cronican is an actor and founding member of The Seeing Place Theater
Image source: The News Daily
Share your Stage Story!

The Stage

Edinburgh Festival Fringe - Edinburgh, Scotland

My Stage Story

"When I was 21 I was lucky enough to travel to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in Scotland. It was my first look at professional, artist-driven theater - everything else I had experienced up until that point was community theater, major regional theater, and Broadway tours (none of which seemed to have a palpable voice of the actor.)

"In Edinburgh I was blown away by a) the amount of theater that was being put up in every nook and cranny in the city, and b) how compelling the art was when being produced and promoted by the very artists on that stage. I was inspired by the structure - actors promoted their shows in the daytime by passing out postcards on the street and supporting other people’s work, and then they performed for that cultivated audience at night. It was a community driven, artistically compelling process that has stuck with me.

"Through writing this story, I’ve just now realized that this time in Edinburgh is, in part, what has inspired me to produce actor-driven work through The Seeing Place Theater. I’m trying to recreate the experience I had that one enchanting summer when the world was opening up to me for the first time. That’s the magic of live theatre."

Based in New York City, Erin Cronican is an actor and founding member of The Seeing Place Theater

Image source: The News Daily

Share your Stage Story!
The Stage
Cambridge Theatre, London
My Stage Story
"I recently took my ten year old daughter, Abi, to a matinee of Matilda. We read the book together when she was younger, and the film has always been one of our favourites.
"I’m not usually one for musicals but we thoroughly enjoyed this one. All the kids in it were fantastically energetic and Alex Gaumond was brilliant as Miss Trunchbull. The stage set is evocative of the children’s theatre we used to see on school trips in the 80s.
"I don’t get to see my daughter a lot (I’m a weekend Dad) so there’s a bit of pressure to find things to do that create meaningful memories. Going to the theatre never fails - there’s a sense of occasion and magic built into the experience. Plus, with the internet touching everything, it still remains a relatively ‘pure’ place to be."
Based between London and Hong Kong, Richard Norris is an analyst for one of the world’s largest management consultancies.
Image credit: Matilda The Musical UK
Have you seen a show that’s moved you? Share it - submit your Stage Story!

The Stage

Cambridge Theatre, London

My Stage Story

"I recently took my ten year old daughter, Abi, to a matinee of Matilda. We read the book together when she was younger, and the film has always been one of our favourites.

"I’m not usually one for musicals but we thoroughly enjoyed this one. All the kids in it were fantastically energetic and Alex Gaumond was brilliant as Miss Trunchbull. The stage set is evocative of the children’s theatre we used to see on school trips in the 80s.

"I don’t get to see my daughter a lot (I’m a weekend Dad) so there’s a bit of pressure to find things to do that create meaningful memories. Going to the theatre never fails - there’s a sense of occasion and magic built into the experience. Plus, with the internet touching everything, it still remains a relatively ‘pure’ place to be."

Based between London and Hong Kong, Richard Norris is an analyst for one of the world’s largest management consultancies.

Image credit: Matilda The Musical UK

Have you seen a show that’s moved you? Share it - submit your Stage Story!
The Stage
The Soho Theatre, London
My Stage Story
My favourite recent experience happened while I was performing at The Soho Theatre in London, UK: Return of the Vanishing Peasant - a one-man show written by Ros Martin and directed by Caroline Rippin for the Menagerie Theatre Company and its annual HOTBED Festival.
Thanks to the Soho Theatre’s continuous support of new writing, this story, about young Brazilian peasant Carlos fighting for his people’s rights, was able to reach London audiences. And it did so at a crucial moment: the protests in Brazil had started once again.
Caroline (my director) and I would read the newspaper on the train while on our way to rehearsals or touring through different cities in the UK and we would find out what the current status of the riots was.
It was a powerful and important experience for us. We felt like we were echoing their fight in a different part of the world, we were listening and being part of something very current. Audience members would approach us after the shows and express the deep impact the piece had had on them. They wanted to know more. They would go home and research, some said.
And I thought, “People don’t seem to listen to each other out there in the world,.. but maybe we can still do it inside a Theatre.” And that still gives me hope.
Originally from Vienna, Vincent Kerschbaum is a London based actor.
Image credit: Andrew Wilkinson (photographer) for Menagerie Theatre Company
Submit your Stage Story

The Stage

The Soho Theatre, London

My Stage Story

My favourite recent experience happened while I was performing at The Soho Theatre in London, UK: Return of the Vanishing Peasant - a one-man show written by Ros Martin and directed by Caroline Rippin for the Menagerie Theatre Company and its annual HOTBED Festival.

Thanks to the Soho Theatre’s continuous support of new writing, this story, about young Brazilian peasant Carlos fighting for his people’s rights, was able to reach London audiences. And it did so at a crucial moment: the protests in Brazil had started once again.

Caroline (my director) and I would read the newspaper on the train while on our way to rehearsals or touring through different cities in the UK and we would find out what the current status of the riots was.

It was a powerful and important experience for us. We felt like we were echoing their fight in a different part of the world, we were listening and being part of something very current. Audience members would approach us after the shows and express the deep impact the piece had had on them. They wanted to know more. They would go home and research, some said.

And I thought, “People don’t seem to listen to each other out there in the world,.. but maybe we can still do it inside a Theatre.” And that still gives me hope.

Originally from Vienna, Vincent Kerschbaum is a London based actor.

Image credit: Andrew Wilkinson (photographer) for Menagerie Theatre Company

Submit your Stage Story
The Stage
Apollo Victoria Theatre, London
My Stage Story
I’ve been to see Wicked…12 times. Some people might think this excessive; I might be one of those people. I have rushed home and waited nervously (on a dial-up connection) to see whether I have won tickets to Idina Menzel’s final performance. I have stood outside the theatre at 8am queuing for day tickets five times. If I had to, I could probably recite the entire musical – not just the singing parts. I am that person. 
Most recently, my fervent dedication meant that on a freezing cold morning in December, on the one day during the Christmas period that I didn’t have to be awake early, I dragged my other half and two dogs out to the theatre to queue for tickets. It was the 27th December and I had not yet been to see Wicked that year, my clock ticks were quickly slipping away. 
We got there just before 8am, and of course we weren’t even the first people there. Two people were stood freezing on the step staring into the foyer hoping they would open soon. As a veteran of the day ticket scene I advised them that they were stood in the wrong place and let them know that nothing was going to happen until 10am, bless them – they’d been there since 7am. Within 10 minutes another three people had joined the queue. 
There is a camaraderie that develops amongst Day Ticketers. The vast majority aren’t Brits, so the tendency to look straight ahead and not make eye contact, is somewhat lessened, but even when there are Brits in the queue, something magic happens – you begin to talk to each other. You discuss which other shows you’ve queued up for, you tell them which of the casts has been your favourite (because chances are you’ve seen it before), you quietly congratulate each other on waking up at the crack at dawn when you see latecomers counting how many people there are in front of them, and you offer a smile of consolation when they realise the chances of them getting a ticket are slim. And when you finally get your hands on that ticket you wave goodbye to your early morning companions and tell them that you hope they enjoy the show and that you’ll probably see them later.
In the evening, when you are sat all warm and comfortable in that theatre, with the green lights of Oz and the dragon sleeping quietly above the audience, waiting for the opening bars of ‘No One Mourns the Wicked’, thoughts of how numb your bum was from sitting on cold steps are forgotten, and you remember exactly why it is always worth it. Every note, from the opening “Good news!” to the final “No one mourns the wicked!” comes together to tell a wonderful story of how you can change a person, how easy it is to be misunderstood, and how the most unexpected of friendships can be the most important of your life. 
I look forward to performance number 13.
Gemma Jacob is a writer based in London and currently has several projects, including a comic book, at various stages of production.
Image credit: writer’s own
Submit your Stage Story

The Stage

Apollo Victoria Theatre, London

My Stage Story

I’ve been to see Wicked…12 times. Some people might think this excessive; I might be one of those people. I have rushed home and waited nervously (on a dial-up connection) to see whether I have won tickets to Idina Menzel’s final performance. I have stood outside the theatre at 8am queuing for day tickets five times. If I had to, I could probably recite the entire musical – not just the singing parts. I am that person.

Most recently, my fervent dedication meant that on a freezing cold morning in December, on the one day during the Christmas period that I didn’t have to be awake early, I dragged my other half and two dogs out to the theatre to queue for tickets. It was the 27th December and I had not yet been to see Wicked that year, my clock ticks were quickly slipping away.

We got there just before 8am, and of course we weren’t even the first people there. Two people were stood freezing on the step staring into the foyer hoping they would open soon. As a veteran of the day ticket scene I advised them that they were stood in the wrong place and let them know that nothing was going to happen until 10am, bless them – they’d been there since 7am. Within 10 minutes another three people had joined the queue.

There is a camaraderie that develops amongst Day Ticketers. The vast majority aren’t Brits, so the tendency to look straight ahead and not make eye contact, is somewhat lessened, but even when there are Brits in the queue, something magic happens – you begin to talk to each other. You discuss which other shows you’ve queued up for, you tell them which of the casts has been your favourite (because chances are you’ve seen it before), you quietly congratulate each other on waking up at the crack at dawn when you see latecomers counting how many people there are in front of them, and you offer a smile of consolation when they realise the chances of them getting a ticket are slim. And when you finally get your hands on that ticket you wave goodbye to your early morning companions and tell them that you hope they enjoy the show and that you’ll probably see them later.

In the evening, when you are sat all warm and comfortable in that theatre, with the green lights of Oz and the dragon sleeping quietly above the audience, waiting for the opening bars of ‘No One Mourns the Wicked’, thoughts of how numb your bum was from sitting on cold steps are forgotten, and you remember exactly why it is always worth it. Every note, from the opening “Good news!” to the final “No one mourns the wicked!” comes together to tell a wonderful story of how you can change a person, how easy it is to be misunderstood, and how the most unexpected of friendships can be the most important of your life.

I look forward to performance number 13.

Gemma Jacob is a writer based in London and currently has several projects, including a comic book, at various stages of production.

Image credit: writer’s own

Submit your Stage Story
The Stage
Music Box Theatre, NYC
My Stage Story
"Perhaps one of the greatest memories of pure theatre-bliss came out of an unexpected source for me: a play! Raised in a city on the Broadway tour circuit, I was brought up on mega-hit, over-saturated, blockbuster musicals. So in late 2007, when I walked up to the Music Box Theatre box office, I had no idea what I was in for.
"I was just starting my training at the Lee Strasberg institute, and was already scoffing at the worship of well-written drama. August: Osage County changed everything. It changed how I viewed theatre, how I acted in theatre, how I spoke about theatre.
"I will never forget Rondi Reed’s larger-than-life Mattie Fae, Deanna Dunagan’s shriveled and toxic Violet, and of course, Amy Morton’s immortal turn as Barbara. When Barbara cornered her mother at the close of Act II and shouted, “I’m running things now!”, I remember the audience leaping to its feet and cheering. I’d never seen that at a play before. The line is now seared into Broadway history.
"The biting, incredibly American story combined with brutal and unhinged characters was a masterclass for any actor, theatre-goer or writer. It re-introduced ‘the play’ to Broadway, and even more importantly, the art of storytelling into Broadway-audiences’ vocabulary. It showed us all, perhaps eerily, how hungry we are for REAL drama."
Originally from Rhode Island, Chris Dieman is an actor and musician who lives in New York where, amongst others, he is a member of The Seeing Place Theater.
Image credit: Playbill
Submit your Stage Story

The Stage

Music Box Theatre, NYC

My Stage Story

"Perhaps one of the greatest memories of pure theatre-bliss came out of an unexpected source for me: a play! Raised in a city on the Broadway tour circuit, I was brought up on mega-hit, over-saturated, blockbuster musicals. So in late 2007, when I walked up to the Music Box Theatre box office, I had no idea what I was in for.

"I was just starting my training at the Lee Strasberg institute, and was already scoffing at the worship of well-written drama. August: Osage County changed everything. It changed how I viewed theatre, how I acted in theatre, how I spoke about theatre.

"I will never forget Rondi Reed’s larger-than-life Mattie Fae, Deanna Dunagan’s shriveled and toxic Violet, and of course, Amy Morton’s immortal turn as Barbara. When Barbara cornered her mother at the close of Act II and shouted, “I’m running things now!”, I remember the audience leaping to its feet and cheering. I’d never seen that at a play before. The line is now seared into Broadway history.

"The biting, incredibly American story combined with brutal and unhinged characters was a masterclass for any actor, theatre-goer or writer. It re-introduced ‘the play’ to Broadway, and even more importantly, the art of storytelling into Broadway-audiences’ vocabulary. It showed us all, perhaps eerily, how hungry we are for REAL drama."

Originally from Rhode Island, Chris Dieman is an actor and musician who lives in New York where, amongst others, he is a member of The Seeing Place Theater.

Image credit: Playbill

Submit your Stage Story